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This show opens at 25a Eastment Street, Northcote in 11 days. Tickets through trybooking

This show opens at 25a Eastment Street, Northcote in 11 days. Tickets through trybooking

The cast of No Exit rehearse at White Elephant Arts

The cast of No Exit, rehearse at White Elephant Arts. 

For more information visit…

https://www.facebook.com/events/367016490074022/

A poster image for S>M>E>G productions upcoming staging of Sartre’s No Exit. This June at the Owl and the Pussycat, Richmond.

A poster image for S>M>E>G productions upcoming staging of Sartre’s No Exit. This June at the Owl and the Pussycat, Richmond.

This week I have been mostly reading….
 
The Master and Margherita by Mikhail Bulgakov
 
People used to ask me, “citizen Merzky, what is your favourite book?”. I used to consider such a question a little second grade fresh. That was before I read The Master and Margherita, which might possibly now be my favourite book (of the books that I have read so far). Are you ready dear reader? It is now time to explain why!
The Master and Margherita is a true tour du force, an opus, a triumph. It is as sardonically witty as Vonnegut, as rich and innovative as Perec, endearingly Quixotic and possessed of that singular ability of Russian writers to convey the slow stifling torments of authoritarian societies without relying on dramatic fireworks, relying on the ennui, the absurd and the human elements of totalitarian regimes. That is not to say that The Master and Margherita is without fireworks, any novel that deploys two concurrent narratives, one detailing a visit by the Devil to Moscow and the other the story of Pontius Pilate, is definitely packing heat. However the claustrophobia, fear and paranoia of Moscow during the purges is deftly handled, sighting officious, pompous and morally cowardly citizens as the enabling source of the environment which the shadowy state menace grows in.
We are treated to a cavalcade of small officials, circumlocutors and writers turned  bureaucrats, each willing to depend on reports and lists, to call the police, to feather their nests and commit their erstwhile colleagues to mental institutions at the first signs of irregularity. The grubbily factual lives of Moscow’s denizens are turned upside down when the Devil pays the city a visit. Faced with a supernatural force outside their belief system, many of those who encounter Mephistopheles find themselves quite broken in the brain; more by their inability to cope with an apparent incongruity than most of what the Devil, disguised initially as a visiting professor of black magic, does himself. 
Running analogously parallel to this (does that make sense?), is the story of Pontius Pilate. Pilate has a cracking headache, exacerbated by the smell of rose oil that wafts into the palace of Herod from all around Jerusalem. In the bright hot sun, with only his faithful dog for company (whose described feelings of admiration for his master are a heart warming nod to Bulgakov’s earlier work ‘The heart of a Dog’) a prisoner is brought before Pilate on a charge of causing rebellion and speaking against the Emperor Tiberius. The prisoner Yeshua professes the goodness of all people, even after being beaten by centurion Ratkiller and is able to cure Pilate’s headache. Despite being a far more effective and strong ruler/person than any we encounter, a deeply conflicted Pilate follows orders and must send Yeshua to his death because of his views that the Emperor is not all power and the Empire not immortal. Thus in both narratives we are confronted with the spectre of moral cowardice and its enabling of oppression, twentieth century Muscovites coming off significantly worse than Pontius Pilate who is cast in a somewhat heroic light.
In fact Pilate is one of several heroes and protagonists in The Master and Margherita. Following the Faustian tradition the Devil is one of them, though Bulgakov’s devil is more openly powerful, self assured and colourfully drawn than Goethe’s. With his retinue, he sets Moscow on its head, to more of his own agenda and purposes than previous incarnations and his role is less of the anti-hero than a true force for good. The eponymous characters complete our set of heroes. The Master is a writer who has been driven to nervous breakdown by the shameful hostility of soviet controlled critics to his novel, which deals with the story of Pontius Pilate. Margherita becomes a witch and through her grace, open mindedness and generosity of spirit is able to win the favour of the devil. With this powerful benefactor she tries to help her imprisoned and tortured lover the Master.
The Master and Margherita is a wonderfully humanist novel of great skill, comedy and tragedy. We are presented with the concept that all people are essentially good but are often afraid and likely to give in to moral cowardice to the detriment of all. It suggests that the behaviour of society flows from that of individuals and decries prejudice, as salvation may come from unexpected quarters.
While I do not wish to unduly compare such issues with the undoubtable more tyrannous and harmful deprivations of totalitarian society, the following comes to mind. In many societies of the early 21st century with well established rule of law and widely supported protection of various human rights, there still persists the phenomenon where citizens fall victim to all forms of abuse and mistreatment in public places and crowded trains without a voice being raised in their defence. In the wake of these events, if they are ever reported, there is an accustomed backlash of commentary but it does not provide a tonic to the apparent epidemic of paralysis. Perhaps a visitation of black magic is in order.
 

This week I have been mostly reading….

 

The Master and Margherita by Mikhail Bulgakov

 

People used to ask me, “citizen Merzky, what is your favourite book?”. I used to consider such a question a little second grade fresh. That was before I read The Master and Margherita, which might possibly now be my favourite book (of the books that I have read so far). Are you ready dear reader? It is now time to explain why!

The Master and Margherita is a true tour du force, an opus, a triumph. It is as sardonically witty as Vonnegut, as rich and innovative as Perec, endearingly Quixotic and possessed of that singular ability of Russian writers to convey the slow stifling torments of authoritarian societies without relying on dramatic fireworks, relying on the ennui, the absurd and the human elements of totalitarian regimes. That is not to say that The Master and Margherita is without fireworks, any novel that deploys two concurrent narratives, one detailing a visit by the Devil to Moscow and the other the story of Pontius Pilate, is definitely packing heat. However the claustrophobia, fear and paranoia of Moscow during the purges is deftly handled, sighting officious, pompous and morally cowardly citizens as the enabling source of the environment which the shadowy state menace grows in.

We are treated to a cavalcade of small officials, circumlocutors and writers turned  bureaucrats, each willing to depend on reports and lists, to call the police, to feather their nests and commit their erstwhile colleagues to mental institutions at the first signs of irregularity. The grubbily factual lives of Moscow’s denizens are turned upside down when the Devil pays the city a visit. Faced with a supernatural force outside their belief system, many of those who encounter Mephistopheles find themselves quite broken in the brain; more by their inability to cope with an apparent incongruity than most of what the Devil, disguised initially as a visiting professor of black magic, does himself.

Running analogously parallel to this (does that make sense?), is the story of Pontius Pilate. Pilate has a cracking headache, exacerbated by the smell of rose oil that wafts into the palace of Herod from all around Jerusalem. In the bright hot sun, with only his faithful dog for company (whose described feelings of admiration for his master are a heart warming nod to Bulgakov’s earlier work ‘The heart of a Dog’) a prisoner is brought before Pilate on a charge of causing rebellion and speaking against the Emperor Tiberius. The prisoner Yeshua professes the goodness of all people, even after being beaten by centurion Ratkiller and is able to cure Pilate’s headache. Despite being a far more effective and strong ruler/person than any we encounter, a deeply conflicted Pilate follows orders and must send Yeshua to his death because of his views that the Emperor is not all power and the Empire not immortal. Thus in both narratives we are confronted with the spectre of moral cowardice and its enabling of oppression, twentieth century Muscovites coming off significantly worse than Pontius Pilate who is cast in a somewhat heroic light.

In fact Pilate is one of several heroes and protagonists in The Master and Margherita. Following the Faustian tradition the Devil is one of them, though Bulgakov’s devil is more openly powerful, self assured and colourfully drawn than Goethe’s. With his retinue, he sets Moscow on its head, to more of his own agenda and purposes than previous incarnations and his role is less of the anti-hero than a true force for good. The eponymous characters complete our set of heroes. The Master is a writer who has been driven to nervous breakdown by the shameful hostility of soviet controlled critics to his novel, which deals with the story of Pontius Pilate. Margherita becomes a witch and through her grace, open mindedness and generosity of spirit is able to win the favour of the devil. With this powerful benefactor she tries to help her imprisoned and tortured lover the Master.

The Master and Margherita is a wonderfully humanist novel of great skill, comedy and tragedy. We are presented with the concept that all people are essentially good but are often afraid and likely to give in to moral cowardice to the detriment of all. It suggests that the behaviour of society flows from that of individuals and decries prejudice, as salvation may come from unexpected quarters.

While I do not wish to unduly compare such issues with the undoubtable more tyrannous and harmful deprivations of totalitarian society, the following comes to mind. In many societies of the early 21st century with well established rule of law and widely supported protection of various human rights, there still persists the phenomenon where citizens fall victim to all forms of abuse and mistreatment in public places and crowded trains without a voice being raised in their defence. In the wake of these events, if they are ever reported, there is an accustomed backlash of commentary but it does not provide a tonic to the apparent epidemic of paralysis. Perhaps a visitation of black magic is in order.

 

MMKilimanjaro on SoundCloud

MMK, the greatest funk/soul band currently grooving. Check them out

This is a song from the play In The Republic of Happiness by Martin Crimp, directed by Dominic Cooke. In The Republic of Happiness was first presented by the English Stage Company at the Royal Court Theatre in the Jerwood Theatre Downstairs on 6 December 2012. Music by Roald van Oosten. From the album 100 % Happy.

Pictures by Gina Cuntstruct

Pictures by Gina Cuntstruct

beautiful traffic models

georgetakei:

From a fan. I have been .gifED! Oh myyy!!! Like and a reblog if you are as excited about this as I am.

georgetakei:

From a fan. I have been .gifED! Oh myyy!!! Like and a reblog if you are as excited about this as I am.

A bit of Fry and Laurie - Spy Drama (by ssmmeeggtube)

The sinister side of African Aid - Eureka Street

georgetakei:

My nephew asked why I don’t have a Tumblr account, given my love of goofy pics. So here it is! To celebrate, I’ve paired with Tumblr and Humans of New York to help with their Hurricane Sandy Fundraiser. http://www.indiegogo.com/HONYTumblr

georgetakei:

My nephew asked why I don’t have a Tumblr account, given my love of goofy pics. So here it is! To celebrate, I’ve paired with Tumblr and Humans of New York to help with their Hurricane Sandy Fundraiser. http://www.indiegogo.com/HONYTumblr

This show opens at 25a Eastment Street, Northcote in 11 days. Tickets through trybooking

This show opens at 25a Eastment Street, Northcote in 11 days. Tickets through trybooking

The cast of No Exit rehearse at White Elephant Arts

The cast of No Exit, rehearse at White Elephant Arts. 

For more information visit…

https://www.facebook.com/events/367016490074022/

A poster image for S>M>E>G productions upcoming staging of Sartre’s No Exit. This June at the Owl and the Pussycat, Richmond.

A poster image for S>M>E>G productions upcoming staging of Sartre’s No Exit. This June at the Owl and the Pussycat, Richmond.

This week I have been mostly reading….
 
The Master and Margherita by Mikhail Bulgakov
 
People used to ask me, “citizen Merzky, what is your favourite book?”. I used to consider such a question a little second grade fresh. That was before I read The Master and Margherita, which might possibly now be my favourite book (of the books that I have read so far). Are you ready dear reader? It is now time to explain why!
The Master and Margherita is a true tour du force, an opus, a triumph. It is as sardonically witty as Vonnegut, as rich and innovative as Perec, endearingly Quixotic and possessed of that singular ability of Russian writers to convey the slow stifling torments of authoritarian societies without relying on dramatic fireworks, relying on the ennui, the absurd and the human elements of totalitarian regimes. That is not to say that The Master and Margherita is without fireworks, any novel that deploys two concurrent narratives, one detailing a visit by the Devil to Moscow and the other the story of Pontius Pilate, is definitely packing heat. However the claustrophobia, fear and paranoia of Moscow during the purges is deftly handled, sighting officious, pompous and morally cowardly citizens as the enabling source of the environment which the shadowy state menace grows in.
We are treated to a cavalcade of small officials, circumlocutors and writers turned  bureaucrats, each willing to depend on reports and lists, to call the police, to feather their nests and commit their erstwhile colleagues to mental institutions at the first signs of irregularity. The grubbily factual lives of Moscow’s denizens are turned upside down when the Devil pays the city a visit. Faced with a supernatural force outside their belief system, many of those who encounter Mephistopheles find themselves quite broken in the brain; more by their inability to cope with an apparent incongruity than most of what the Devil, disguised initially as a visiting professor of black magic, does himself. 
Running analogously parallel to this (does that make sense?), is the story of Pontius Pilate. Pilate has a cracking headache, exacerbated by the smell of rose oil that wafts into the palace of Herod from all around Jerusalem. In the bright hot sun, with only his faithful dog for company (whose described feelings of admiration for his master are a heart warming nod to Bulgakov’s earlier work ‘The heart of a Dog’) a prisoner is brought before Pilate on a charge of causing rebellion and speaking against the Emperor Tiberius. The prisoner Yeshua professes the goodness of all people, even after being beaten by centurion Ratkiller and is able to cure Pilate’s headache. Despite being a far more effective and strong ruler/person than any we encounter, a deeply conflicted Pilate follows orders and must send Yeshua to his death because of his views that the Emperor is not all power and the Empire not immortal. Thus in both narratives we are confronted with the spectre of moral cowardice and its enabling of oppression, twentieth century Muscovites coming off significantly worse than Pontius Pilate who is cast in a somewhat heroic light.
In fact Pilate is one of several heroes and protagonists in The Master and Margherita. Following the Faustian tradition the Devil is one of them, though Bulgakov’s devil is more openly powerful, self assured and colourfully drawn than Goethe’s. With his retinue, he sets Moscow on its head, to more of his own agenda and purposes than previous incarnations and his role is less of the anti-hero than a true force for good. The eponymous characters complete our set of heroes. The Master is a writer who has been driven to nervous breakdown by the shameful hostility of soviet controlled critics to his novel, which deals with the story of Pontius Pilate. Margherita becomes a witch and through her grace, open mindedness and generosity of spirit is able to win the favour of the devil. With this powerful benefactor she tries to help her imprisoned and tortured lover the Master.
The Master and Margherita is a wonderfully humanist novel of great skill, comedy and tragedy. We are presented with the concept that all people are essentially good but are often afraid and likely to give in to moral cowardice to the detriment of all. It suggests that the behaviour of society flows from that of individuals and decries prejudice, as salvation may come from unexpected quarters.
While I do not wish to unduly compare such issues with the undoubtable more tyrannous and harmful deprivations of totalitarian society, the following comes to mind. In many societies of the early 21st century with well established rule of law and widely supported protection of various human rights, there still persists the phenomenon where citizens fall victim to all forms of abuse and mistreatment in public places and crowded trains without a voice being raised in their defence. In the wake of these events, if they are ever reported, there is an accustomed backlash of commentary but it does not provide a tonic to the apparent epidemic of paralysis. Perhaps a visitation of black magic is in order.
 

This week I have been mostly reading….

 

The Master and Margherita by Mikhail Bulgakov

 

People used to ask me, “citizen Merzky, what is your favourite book?”. I used to consider such a question a little second grade fresh. That was before I read The Master and Margherita, which might possibly now be my favourite book (of the books that I have read so far). Are you ready dear reader? It is now time to explain why!

The Master and Margherita is a true tour du force, an opus, a triumph. It is as sardonically witty as Vonnegut, as rich and innovative as Perec, endearingly Quixotic and possessed of that singular ability of Russian writers to convey the slow stifling torments of authoritarian societies without relying on dramatic fireworks, relying on the ennui, the absurd and the human elements of totalitarian regimes. That is not to say that The Master and Margherita is without fireworks, any novel that deploys two concurrent narratives, one detailing a visit by the Devil to Moscow and the other the story of Pontius Pilate, is definitely packing heat. However the claustrophobia, fear and paranoia of Moscow during the purges is deftly handled, sighting officious, pompous and morally cowardly citizens as the enabling source of the environment which the shadowy state menace grows in.

We are treated to a cavalcade of small officials, circumlocutors and writers turned  bureaucrats, each willing to depend on reports and lists, to call the police, to feather their nests and commit their erstwhile colleagues to mental institutions at the first signs of irregularity. The grubbily factual lives of Moscow’s denizens are turned upside down when the Devil pays the city a visit. Faced with a supernatural force outside their belief system, many of those who encounter Mephistopheles find themselves quite broken in the brain; more by their inability to cope with an apparent incongruity than most of what the Devil, disguised initially as a visiting professor of black magic, does himself.

Running analogously parallel to this (does that make sense?), is the story of Pontius Pilate. Pilate has a cracking headache, exacerbated by the smell of rose oil that wafts into the palace of Herod from all around Jerusalem. In the bright hot sun, with only his faithful dog for company (whose described feelings of admiration for his master are a heart warming nod to Bulgakov’s earlier work ‘The heart of a Dog’) a prisoner is brought before Pilate on a charge of causing rebellion and speaking against the Emperor Tiberius. The prisoner Yeshua professes the goodness of all people, even after being beaten by centurion Ratkiller and is able to cure Pilate’s headache. Despite being a far more effective and strong ruler/person than any we encounter, a deeply conflicted Pilate follows orders and must send Yeshua to his death because of his views that the Emperor is not all power and the Empire not immortal. Thus in both narratives we are confronted with the spectre of moral cowardice and its enabling of oppression, twentieth century Muscovites coming off significantly worse than Pontius Pilate who is cast in a somewhat heroic light.

In fact Pilate is one of several heroes and protagonists in The Master and Margherita. Following the Faustian tradition the Devil is one of them, though Bulgakov’s devil is more openly powerful, self assured and colourfully drawn than Goethe’s. With his retinue, he sets Moscow on its head, to more of his own agenda and purposes than previous incarnations and his role is less of the anti-hero than a true force for good. The eponymous characters complete our set of heroes. The Master is a writer who has been driven to nervous breakdown by the shameful hostility of soviet controlled critics to his novel, which deals with the story of Pontius Pilate. Margherita becomes a witch and through her grace, open mindedness and generosity of spirit is able to win the favour of the devil. With this powerful benefactor she tries to help her imprisoned and tortured lover the Master.

The Master and Margherita is a wonderfully humanist novel of great skill, comedy and tragedy. We are presented with the concept that all people are essentially good but are often afraid and likely to give in to moral cowardice to the detriment of all. It suggests that the behaviour of society flows from that of individuals and decries prejudice, as salvation may come from unexpected quarters.

While I do not wish to unduly compare such issues with the undoubtable more tyrannous and harmful deprivations of totalitarian society, the following comes to mind. In many societies of the early 21st century with well established rule of law and widely supported protection of various human rights, there still persists the phenomenon where citizens fall victim to all forms of abuse and mistreatment in public places and crowded trains without a voice being raised in their defence. In the wake of these events, if they are ever reported, there is an accustomed backlash of commentary but it does not provide a tonic to the apparent epidemic of paralysis. Perhaps a visitation of black magic is in order.

 

MMKilimanjaro on SoundCloud

MMK, the greatest funk/soul band currently grooving. Check them out

This is a song from the play In The Republic of Happiness by Martin Crimp, directed by Dominic Cooke. In The Republic of Happiness was first presented by the English Stage Company at the Royal Court Theatre in the Jerwood Theatre Downstairs on 6 December 2012. Music by Roald van Oosten. From the album 100 % Happy.

tn

tn

Pictures by Gina Cuntstruct

Pictures by Gina Cuntstruct

beautiful traffic models

georgetakei:

From a fan. I have been .gifED! Oh myyy!!! Like and a reblog if you are as excited about this as I am.

georgetakei:

From a fan. I have been .gifED! Oh myyy!!! Like and a reblog if you are as excited about this as I am.

A bit of Fry and Laurie - Spy Drama (by ssmmeeggtube)

The sinister side of African Aid - Eureka Street

georgetakei:

My nephew asked why I don’t have a Tumblr account, given my love of goofy pics. So here it is! To celebrate, I’ve paired with Tumblr and Humans of New York to help with their Hurricane Sandy Fundraiser. http://www.indiegogo.com/HONYTumblr

georgetakei:

My nephew asked why I don’t have a Tumblr account, given my love of goofy pics. So here it is! To celebrate, I’ve paired with Tumblr and Humans of New York to help with their Hurricane Sandy Fundraiser. http://www.indiegogo.com/HONYTumblr

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